Sea Mullet2017-11-30T01:24:53+00:00

SEA MULLET

HABITAT
With the arrival of autumn’s cooler waters and westerly winds I leave the protected estuaries for the open sea. I journey north to warmer waters to spawn and my juveniles return to shelter in the estuaries and start the cycle all over again. 

Happy Fish mullet is wild caught in some of the most pristine and carefully monitored fishing grounds in NSW: the Manning River, Wallis Lake, Smiths Lake and the Myall Lakes. 

HABITS
I’ve one of highest omega 3 content of all fish,  can produce 1.6 to 4.8million eggs in my lifetime and am fast growing, making me a more sustainable eating option

HARVEST
Seine and gill nets. Seine (haul) nets surround an area and are hauled either from the shore or from the boat itself. Gill (mesh) nets are a large net wall that hangs vertically in the water column and the fish swim into it. Environmental impacts of harvest methods is largely dependant on HOW nets are used. For more on sustainability and quality measures visit individual fishermen profiles

HANDLING
Harvested with care and iced immediately, ensures fish are rendered unconscious in seconds. This reduces fish resistance, lactic acid and maintains glucose in the flesh, enhancing the delicate texture, sweet flavour and contributes to a longer shelf life.

TASTE
Good BBQ and best sashimied. A fishermen tasting for the first time: “Amazing! a rather exotic and erotic experience. Actually it tastes better than it does cooked?” Sashimi mullet tastes remarkably of delicate flesh oyster, and like an oyster they are a bottom filter feeders. They are quite oily, with highest oil content April to May and have a strong distinctive flavour .